The Palouse Through Their Eyes

I am pleased to present another installment in my “through their eyes” series.  This time a group of images from our participants on our recent Palouse Harvest tour. Harvest came very early this year, but, this group brought their good time with them and made some wonderful images.  Remember to click on the hot link to see more of each participants work.

 

Ginny Brown

“Steptoe Sunrise – It was the last day of the workshop, and we went to Steptoe for a final sunrise shoot.  I really wanted a shot of the “morning tree,” which is a lone tree beautifully illuminated by the sunrise under optimal circumstances, but that wasn’t going to happen that day.  Too much haze, not enough separation between the tree and the background, farm equipment in the way, etc.  So, in spite of taking probably 20 shots, I wasn’t happy and started looking around.  I found this beautiful scene with its curves and patterns, but it was only when I got home and processed the image that I saw what I actually had.  The moral:  be open to all possibilities, let go of preconceived ideas, and trust your vision.”

Patterns new perfectly clear workflow

Albert Bronson

“Whenever I am photographing with a group, I try to look beyond the subject we came to photograph—in this case, the grand landscape—and find the details that are often overlooked within the landscape. On the recent Palouse Harvest tour, I found a case of empty soda bottles that had become home to a spider. A floating seed had settled into the web. The juxtaposition of the natural and manmade caught my eye. The deep green glass of the bottles presented a pleasing contrast with the cobwebs and seed nested among them.”

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Kris Morgan

“The Palouse is filled with wondrous variety…from patterns created by the rolling hills and fields of wheat, weathered barns, buildings, and beautiful skies, old cars and trucks, sunflowers, silos, and wind turbines,  to wonderful surprises like the old wheel fence at Dahmen Farm. The challenge, especially with repeat visits, is to capture these treasures, the sense of place, the visual design in unique, creative ways that go “beyond the handshake”. It is this challenge that makes the Palouse a favorite and the nurturing and encouragement that comes with traveling with John, Dan, and friends enriches the experience making it special.”

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Rona Schwarz – Steptoe Blur

“It is probably my favorite or one of my favorites of about two dozen that I did.  One of the reasons it is a favorite is that I love to create blurs for me it captures the essence of the rolling hills and the harvest colors as well as the majesty of the region.”

 

RSchwarz_Blur

Joe Bumgardner

“I am drawn to this particular image because of its simplicity. It is illuminated with complimentary lighting. The composition contains pleasing elements of design including contrasting curves, lines, pattern, texture, color, and shape; it also contains my favorite subject matter ‘nature’!”

2015 Palouse Images captured by Joe R. Bumgardner, M.D.

2015 Palouse Images captured by Joe R. Bumgardner, M.D.

Nancy Fezell

“From the first time I saw the Palouse, I was captivated by the patterns on the land –  made by nature and by man. I loved the gentle, undulating hills, the colors and shades of the crops in different seasons, and the stripes and circles left on the land after the harvest. Together, nature and man have created a unique landscape.”

Heading home

Wendy Hannum

“The essence of the Palouse to me during the wheat harvest is the actual harvesting.  The combines themselves add substance to a static landscape.   I loved the signature patterns they cut into the fields.  It is as much art as function.”

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Debbie Winchester 

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Beamie Young 

“My favorite is Auntie Em’s house. I love the shadows, and the tracks in the wheat make it look like someone had to make a quick exit. That gets my imagination going…”

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Jeff Levine

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3 Comments

  1. Paul Lebby September 16, 2015 at 9:40 am #

    JB, “Through their eyes” remains one of my favorite blog posts to view, I love seeing places through the cameras of others… How everyone views a scene differently based on how they interpret, feel, express, remember, emote, etc. it reminds me how we bring to photography everything that is unique to each of us, our memories, emotions, thoughts, interpretations, loves, hates, goals, frustrations, achievements, learning and creativity.

    Thanks for enlightening my morning with this post.

    Paul.

    • JB September 16, 2015 at 9:55 am #

      Paul, thanks for your kind comment. And for reminding us of what we bring to the act of photography! Looking forward to seeing you again in a few months.

  2. Lea Gallardo September 16, 2015 at 10:58 am #

    Love the photos and the comments. This trip is on my bucket list!

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