Cape Cod_2013Nov05_0001V2

Fuji X-Pro1 18-55 lens f/8

I’ve been using social media much less. I still enjoy catching up with family and friends and find it to be a good “business” tool, however, the time I was investing was drawing me away from more important things.  I also noticed that I was starting to feel competitive with regard to my photography where there is no place for competition. I was seeing others tremendous work and feeling pressure to produce equal or better quality.  Feeling pressure to post yet another post showing I was still active, shooting, making worthwhile images.  Then in some quiet time, I realized this is not who I want to be.  Rather, I want to be able to trust. Trust in my ability to be a good photographer.  I don’t want to feel the need for others accolades or approval.  Don’t get me wrong, I’m human and kind words are alway welcome and feel good. I just don’t what to feel that I must receive them to validate what I’m doing. When I’m asked why I love photography, my answer is that it feeds my soul.  I love the process of making photographs. I love how I feel when I’m out making images whether I get a “keeper” or not. I am finding I shoot much less now. I don’t shoot as many frames.  I’m more in touch with what I’m being drawn to for subject matter. I’m more aware of the light.  I’m more selective about what I want to photograph. I don’t sell much of my work, I don’t try very hard to do so either.  Its just not that important to me.  What is important?  The experiences that I have been blessed with as a photographer. Photography has gifted me with many wonderful friends.  Photography has blessed me with the opportunity to travel to places I never imagined I would.  Photography has blessed me with being a teacher that I never knew I could be.  This has allowed me to share my passion with others, nudging them to soar on their own wings, trusting themselves, believing they can create images that make their hearts sing!  This gives me great joy and makes my heart sing.

As we approach the time of year when we are asked to make goals, might I suggest we forget about them?  Yup, forget about them, at least with your photography life.  Instead, I would encourage you to trust, to believe in yourself and in the creative process. Allow the creative process to happen on its own.  And, know that trusting includes being okay with being idle.  Nancy Rotenberg in her book, Photography and the Creative Life, has this to say about being idle. “Trusting the process also involves daring to be idle.  We live in a culture that views idleness as something slovenly, lazy and non-production.  It is only when you stop and reflect that you can be filled and recharged.  What you photograph today could be the result of yesterday’s “idling”.  The only way to know if awareness is entering your body is for you to slow down long enough to notice.  Awareness gives you mindfulness.  Mindfulness gives you insight.”  Rather than feeling pressure to be creative, be okay with being idle, recognizing this idle time is good. Its okay to have times when you are not producing.  I have written a number of songs.  Oft times months pass before a new song would appear and even then, I would rewrite and change things over and over. Yet, my favorite songs seemed to come from out of nowhere and took just minutes to write. I believe they came out of inspiration, out of being idle and listening. They were not forced. Photography is much the same or at least it should be.  This is really just an extension of what I’ve written about in previous posts with regard to chasing images.  Be open to the creative process rather than chasing it.  Trust your abilities and allow for creativity or images to present themselves. Don’t force it. For those who know me, being idle is not easy, however, as I try and practice it, I find I am more satisfied with the quality of my images. 

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