20131001_New Hampshire_0935Glow

Fuji X-E1 – 55-200mm

In my last post I said, “at first blush there seemed to be just one composition, just one shot, the wall of color, however, that is almost never true.”   The lead image in today’s post came after being mesmerized by the wall of color, working that scene AND THEN looking for something else.  It pays to stay in a location for more than a few minutes.  If you are still and allow it, more images will present themselves.  Don’t be so quick to move on to another location. And look, there was a vertical composition too!

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Fuji X-E1 – 55-200mm

A comment with regard to the comments that were shared on my last post.  With the exception of one, all liked the tighter square crop best.  If you recall, I said I presented three right answers, however, most settled on one they preferred.  What does this mean?  First, I would suggest if you had never seen the square crop you would have liked one of the other image just as well.  In addition and probably more importantly, I believe it cements the idea that it pays to work a scene that you are drawn to.  As you simplify the scene, leaving behind just the elements that matter, while eliminating all that don’t, typically the image becomes stronger.  I think that is exactly what happened with that last post.  Folks were drawn to the neat tidy composition more than the others.

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While shooting with Dewitt Jones one time, I was struck by how patient and willing he was to stay with a subject.  He found thistle in a field as the sun was setting and stayed in that spot for almost 2 hours.  He never moved, he was invested in that moment.  He was drawn to this particular scene and was willing to stay and work it.  I remember his wife Lynette saying, just move on if you wish, he will be there for awhile!  She knew that he would be happy alone, working the scene.  I remember thinking, what on earth does he see?  I don’t see a thing! Was I ever wrong, the result of his patience was brilliant!  

For the processing of the lead images, I used a diffused glow technique.

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